Huntingdon and Sudbury memorials first to benefit from Hopkins Homes’ fund

War memorials in Huntingdon and Sudbury have been announced as the first be selected for funding from the Hopkins Homes war memorials fund.

As part of the £500,000 Hopkins charitable fund announced last year, the £10,000-a-year war memorials grant will be administered by War Memorials Trust to support the repair and conservation of East Anglia’s war memorials.

In Huntingdon, the Grade II listed South African Boer War memorial commemorates the 38 men from Huntingdon who died fighting in the Boer War between 1899 and 1902. The memorial is currently in a poor state and requires cleaning. A £1,330 grant has been offered towards repair and cleaning works.

The Sudbury war memorial is also Grade II listed. It is a cross made of Portland Stone with bronze plaques commemorating the fallen of World War I and World War II and it was dedicated in 1921. A grant of £3,290 towards essential conservation works has been offered.

James Hopkins, Executive Chairman of Hopkins Homes said: “I’m delighted that the first grants for the conservation of war memorials across East Anglia have now been announced, as part of the Hopkins charitable fund. War memorials are an important focal point for communities, this will be particularly poignant this year for communities commemorating the centenary of the end of World War I. It is an honour to help support this conservation work and I am looking forward to learning more about the projects and seeing the results.”

Frances Moreton, Director of War Memorials Trust said: “War Memorials Trust is delighted that Hopkins Homes has asked us to administer their generous donation to support war memorials in East Anglia. This year the nation will mark the centenary of World War I so we have seen a significant increase in the number of requests from communities hoping to repair and conserve their war memorials.

“We are very pleased to support worthy projects such as Huntingdon and Sudbury and look forward to allocating the remainder of the generous contribution from Hopkins Homes to other projects in the area.”

It is believed that up to 8,000 of the UK’s estimated 100,000 war memorials are in Poor or Very bad condition. War Memorials Trust is the only charity in the UK which works solely for their protection. Since it was founded 20 years ago, it has administered more than £4 million to 1,800 communities looking to repair and conserve their memorials.

“We encourage everyone to visit their local war memorial, check the condition of it and get in touch with War Memorials Trust if they have any concerns.” Frances added.

Grant application deadlines are quarterly, those interested in applying will be asked to complete a simple pre-application form to check eligibility. To find out more about War Memorials Trust and how to apply for a grant please visit www.warmemorials.org